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About UltraMIST®

UltraMIST Promotes Natural Wound Healing Through 3 Distinct Processes

Cross-sectional illustration of UltraMIST triple-action healing process

Powerful ultrasound energy is transferred to the wound surface and deep below to promote healing in 3 ways.

UltraMIST Induces Multiple Physiologic Responses

  • Increase Perfusion1
  • Decrease Inflammation2,3
  • Decrease Bacteria4,5

See UltraMIST Healing in Action

Watch a brief video animation that illustrates the mechanism of action of UltraMIST.

Increased Vasodilation

Factors such as adequate perfusion and vasodilation are required to promote the healing process.

Boston University3*

  • 12 patients with an average ulcer duration of 29 weeks
  • Three study groups: 1 standard of care (SOC) and 2 UltraMIST groups
  • 12 UltraMIST treatments
  • VEGF spiked after 6 MIST® treatments to stimulate angiogenesis and then declined as the wound moved on to healing
  • SOC-treated group: 39% wound area reduction
  • UltraMIST-treated group: 86% wound area reduction
Download a PDF with more clinical evidence of how UltraMIST promotes healing through increased perfusion and vasodilation.
MIST Therapy Promoted Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) Expression in Non-Healing Diabetic Foot Ulcers (DFUs)

MIST Therapy Promoted Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) Expression in Non-Healing Diabetic Foot Ulcers (DFUs)

MIST® Therapy Reduced Pro-Inflammatory Cytokines in Non-Healing Venous Leg Ulcers (VLU)

MIST Therapy Reduced Pro-Inflammatory Cytokines in Non-Healing Venous Leg Ulcers (VLU)2

Decreased Inflammation

Initial injury triggers an inflammatory response within the wound. Controlled inflammation is beneficial, but sustained inflammation can lead to stalled healing.6 Cellular balance is restored by reducing sustained levels of inflammation, allowing wound healing to progress.

University of Miami2*

  • 10 patients with confirmed VLU wounds present 6 months
  • Failed to improve in the previous 30 days with multilayered compression bandages and SOC
  • 12 MIST treatments
    • 3 treatments/week (4-week duration)
Download a PDF with more clinical evidence of how UltraMIST promotes healing by reducing the inflammatory response within the wound.

Reduced Bacterial Load

High levels of bacteria delay wound healing.

Multicenter trial4*

  • 11 patients with Stage III pressure ulcers showing no clinical signs of acute infection
  • Pre-treatment bacteria loads were >105 CFU/g tissue
  • 13 different types of bacteria were cultured from pre-punch biopsies
  • 6 MIST treatments
    • 3 treatments/week (2-week duration)
Download a PDF with more clinical evidence of how UltraMIST promotes healing by reducing the bacterial count within a wound.
Mechanical stress caused by low-frequency ultrasound can result in bacterial cell death and a reduction in bacterial count

Mechanical stress caused by low-frequency ultrasound can result in bacterial cell death and a reduction in bacterial count.

*Data were compiled utilizing MIST Therapy. UltraMIST is the successor but maintains the same mechanism of action.

UltraMIST System Components

UltraMIST System Components

  • Generator
  • Treatment wand
  • Disposable single-use applicator

Other materials required:

  • 0.9% normal saline 100cc – 1000cc bag
  • Germicidal wipes for cleaning/disinfecting
  • Absorbent pads

UltraMIST Is Unique

UltraMIST is unique because it never touches the wound, yet promotes healing with low-frequency ultrasound energy from a self-contained device.

  • The UltraMIST applicator is designed as a single-use (per patient) disposable unit to avoid contamination
  • UltraMIST should be administered by a trained healthcare professional
  • UltraMIST meets all required testing and safety standards

UltraMIST Is Easy to Operate

Easy to set up and use

  • Prepare the patient for treatment
  • Turn system on
  • Attach disposable single-use applicator and saline
  • Select wound size
  • Start treatment

Convenient storage

Store applicator/system at -25° to 70°C, with relative humidity 30% to 75% (non-condensing).

Clinical Outcomes Gallery

UltraMIST used on post-surgical osteotomy of 1st and 5th metatarsal

Case characteristics:

  • 48-year-old female presented with tissue necrosis of right foot due to frostbite that occurred when post-surgical ice was left on continuously for 38 hours
  • Supportive treatment included protective dressing, dimethicone small molecule protective skin barrier, silver hydrogel with TheraBond over granulated areas
  • Patient received ultrasound treatment with UltraMIST twice a week for 4 weeks
  • UltraMIST increased local perfusion/vasodilation, decreased bioburn and local wound inflammation, and accelerated tissue regeneration to the area
  • Digits were preserved with viable tissue healing; full closure achieved within 10 weeks of treatment initiation
Photo of necrotic toes

Baseline Day 1:
Necrotic toes prior to treatment with UltraMIST

Photo of healed toe ulcers

Week 10:
Full closure of great toe ulcer, 1st & 5th toe after 8 treatments with UltraMIST

UltraMIST used on traumatic deep tissue injury with chronic venous insufficiency

Case characteristics:

  • 87-year-old female presented with deep tissue injury caused by trauma
  • Supportive treatment included local care with silver hydrogel and collagen, super-absorbent polymer dressings, and compression stockings
  • Patient received ultrasound treatment with UltraMIST twice a week for 6 weeks
  • UltraMIST increased local perfusion/vasodilation, decreased bioburn and local wound inflammation, and accelerated tissue regeneration to the area
  • Area closed with minimal scarring, with full closure achieved within 77 days of initiating treatment
Photo of wound after first treatment

Day 1:
Wound after first UltraMIST treatment

Photo of closed wound after 12 treatments

Day 77:
Area closed with minimal scarring following 12 UltraMIST treatments

UltraMIST used on surgical dehiscence

Case characteristics:

  • 73-year-old female presented with surgical incision dehiscence 3 weeks post-op sesamoidectomy
  • Supportive treatment included local care with silver hydrogel, foam dressing, offload in RWC
  • Patient received treatment with UltraMIST twice a week for 5 treatments
  • UltraMIST increased local perfusion/vasodilation, decreased bioburn and local wound inflammation, and accelerated tissue granulation to the wound bed and wound edge migration
  • Wound bed prepared for human dehydrated amnion allograft membrane with no major safety concerns observed
Photo of dehiscence wound after 1 UltraMIST treatment

Day 1:
Wound after first UltraMIST treatment

Photo of wound bed ready for allograft

Day 17:
Area prepared for amniotic allograft following 5 UltraMIST treatments

Connect With Celularity

For product questions, or ordering information, please contact us at customerservice@celularity.com or call us at 1-844-963-2273.

For medical inquiries, please contact us at medicalaffairs@celularity.com

References:

  1. Ennis WJ, Valdes W, Gainer M, Meneses P. Evaluation of clinical effectiveness of MIST ultrasound therapy for the healing of chronic wounds. Adv Skin Wound Care. 2006;19(8):437-446.
  2. Escandon J, Vivas AC, Perez R, Kirsner R, Davis S. A prospective pilot study of ultrasound therapy effectiveness in refractory venous leg ulcers. Int Wound J. 2012;9(5):570-578.
  3. Yao M, Hasturk H, Kantarci A, et al. A pilot study evaluating noncontact low frequency ultrasound and underlying molecular mechanism on diabetic foot ulcers. Int Wound J. 2014;11(6):586-593.
  4. Serena T, Lee SK, Lam K, Attar P, Meneses P, Ennis W. The impact of noncontact, nonthermal, low-frequency ultrasound on bacterial counts in experimental and chronic wounds. Ostomy Wound Manage. 2009;55(1):22-30.
  5. Kavros SJ, Schenck EC. Use of noncontact low-frequency ultrasound in the treatment of chronic foot and leg ulcerations: a 51 patient analysis. J Am Podiatr Med Assoc. 2007;97(2):95-101.
  6. Zhao R, Liang H, Clarke E, Jackson C, Xue M. Inflammation in chronic wounds. Int J Mol Sci. 2016;17(12):2085.